A Dark Corner

Sep 08

Time for another digital detox

Might be back, might not be.

It’s been fun kids but I need a break. Ill be back in from time to time so message me if you wish to keep in touch.

Sep 07

[video]

Sep 05

If you have to write it on a tee shirt, I doubt very much that you are.
In fact, it’s very likely you’re worth fucking, but not worth knowing. I’ll leave you to sit a while and work out how that’s different.
Via: chattelprod:

If you have to write it on a tee shirt, I doubt very much that you are.

In fact, it’s very likely you’re worth fucking, but not worth knowing. I’ll leave you to sit a while and work out how that’s different.

Via: chattelprod:

(Source: tush)

Sep 04

[video]

Professor Longhair, Big Chief

[video]

[video]

[video]

List of Harry Potter Spells

Sep 03

Can we stop and think for a moment?

Syria and chemical weapons.

The UN sends a “fact finding team”. They are half way through their work and are currently analysing the results. The UN says it might be another 7 to 10 days before their findings can be published.

Meantime, ahead of any findings from the UN team the USA, France and a couple of other countries are publishing their “conclusions” that there’s no doubt the Govt used chemicals and France today says they have even uncovered “intelligence”, satellite pictures etc that “proves” the Army was responsible and even where the shelling came from.

Australia lines up behind the US and says that “if they go, we have to go to”. After all, the USA are our allies, right?

And so the warpigs crank up their propaganda machines.

Excuse me but haven’t we heard this song before? Didn’t we learn anything about the consequences of rushing into Iraq? Are we really going to be that stupid again? Barge in with some kind of “necessary military response” (whatever the fuck that means) before there is ANY conclusive evidence in the public domain?

The only saving grace this time is that Britain’s Lower House has said NO to any British support, not even “at this time” but straight up No, meaning if they want to change their mind, there needs to be a whole new debate in the House to overturn this decision, presumably if/when there is new evidence.

Please God, let this stupidity end. And yeah, Im fucking angry and I approve this message!

Aug 31

The Cartographer's Paper: French lesson for the day -

thecartographerspaper:

alexander51:

domwithpen:

thecartographerspaper:

I’m a linguistic morphologist at heart. I love the way language shapes and forms meanings by the structure of a word or the order of a sentence. In that way, English is so very bland.

So in the theme of D/s, here is a beautiful breakdown of the most common of phrases:

"Please, Sir."

In…

This. Is. Fucking. Great.

If I may make one small correction since this is a most informative piece about the derivation of “Please, Sir”. The correct grammar in French when addressing a superior (or someone of equal rank with whom you are not acquainted) is “vous”, not “te”. So the correct address in the example referred to by the writer would be “s’il vous plait”, not “s’il te plait”. Both are correct grammatically but to address a Master or Sir as “te” would be very bad form and looked down upon as simply not polite. The only possible exemption would be if permission had been given by the superior due to a familiarity have arisen between the two. This could possibly be the case where a long standing relationship exists and particularly if the pair are currently intimate and most likely would still only be permissible in private. Publicly “vous” would always be used.

In French, it is known as “la politesse”.

Thank you for this, however I took exception to that grammatical nuance in French on the basis of religious reference, where “tu” is used in place of “vous,” so as to convey a monotheism, not a polytheism, and that if using “tu” in reference to a deity is acceptable, even if for the sake of clarification, it may also be appropriate in a D/s context. Ultimately, this difference would come down to a preference between two partners.

Agreed…if both partners had agreed. You and I are in heated agreement! I was simply wishing to heed the need for such agreement rather than taking a liberty and suffering some kind of consequence. 

Aug 29

Me too! She’s as cute as can be..
via: beautyquean:

Holy shit I’m in love with this girl!

Me too! She’s as cute as can be..

via: beautyquean:

Holy shit I’m in love with this girl!

(Source: xhamster.com)

Aug 28

neutralangel:

deadpresidents:

One of the greatest photos of a President, along with the famous “Loneliest Job” photo of John F. Kennedy, is this photograph of an anguished Lyndon Johnson listening to a recorded report about Vietnam from his son-in-law, Charles Robb (later a Senator and Governor of Virginia), who was serving there.
Vietnam crippled LBJ’s Presidency, turned the people against him, and killed the Great Society.  When Johnson lost the people, he lost the will to fight, and he lost the will to live.  He dropped out of the 1968 Presidential race and went home to Texas where, “They know when you’re sick and care when you die.”

Richard Nixon, Johnson’s immediate successor and a President who knew something about heartbreak and failure, was among the best of those who tried to put LBJ’s last years in perspective:
"I think President Johnson died of a broken heart, I really do.  Here’s Johnson, this big, strong, intelligent, tough guy, practically getting so emotional that he’d almost cry, because his critics didn’t appreciate him.  He, till the very last, thought that he might be able to win them.  And the point was, rather than have them love him, he should have tried to do what he could have done very well — have them respect him.  And in the end he lost.  He neither gained the love nor retained the respect.”
It’s tough to love a guy like Lyndon Baines Johnson.  His own personality and Vietnam made it even more difficult.  But he does not get enough respect, even among historians who agree that he is shafted when it comes to his domestic accomplishments.  LBJ did more for Civil Rights than any other President.  Yes, I said, ANY other President.  Even Lincoln.  Lincoln did some great things.  Lincoln helped free the slaves.  But if Lincoln took off the shackles, LBJ enacted laws that protected their freedom.  Not just their freedom, either.  Our freedom.  You are all affected, every day, by something that Lyndon Johnson did.  If you don’t think so, tell me your daily schedule and I’ll give you an example.
On his 105th birthday, I’m not asking you to love Lyndon Johnson.  But I wouldn’t have posted an avalanche of LBJ content on his birthday if I didn’t.  I just hope you take the time to respect what he did, and that’s all I think he would ask of you, too.  Then he’d probably cuss at you and squeeze your arm and kick you in the shin and tell you to go raise hell.

I’ve only reblogged a fraction of what Anthony has posted today about LBJ, but I did want to say that it was Anthony’s writing that made me at least respect LBJ and realize the things he did for this country. For a long time, Vietnam overshadowed the rest of LBJ’s legacy for me, as it did for a lot of Americans.  
But deeper than that, I think we take too much of what LBJ did for granted, or we don’t realize the sheer importance of something like the Civil Rights Act, or the difficulty in getting it passed in a country that was barely a decade from Brown v. Board of Education. If you thought Obama had a rough road getting the ACA passed, imagine how much harder it would have been if the majority of the country hated doctors. 
My point is that it’s easy to consume facts about history and think you know it. But understanding it is something entirely different. Anthony clearly does, and, what’s more, he can make others understand it. And in a time where we’re literally taking away some of the same protections that the Civil Rights Act put in place, that’s more important than ever. If you don’t understand WHY Johnson did what he did, or HOW he did it, it’s hard to understand why the removal of some of the Voting Rights Act protections earlier this year is a huge problem. To pull out an old cliche, if we don’t pay attention to history, we are doomed to repeat it. I’d prefer to live in the country full of protections that Johnson left us, rather than the one that Wallace tried to preserve.

He did great things, but sadly he. like Nixon who followed him, will be remembered in popular history for his dogged refusal to accept the fact that the Vietnam war was unwinnable.

neutralangel:

deadpresidents:

One of the greatest photos of a President, along with the famous “Loneliest Job” photo of John F. Kennedy, is this photograph of an anguished Lyndon Johnson listening to a recorded report about Vietnam from his son-in-law, Charles Robb (later a Senator and Governor of Virginia), who was serving there.

Vietnam crippled LBJ’s Presidency, turned the people against him, and killed the Great Society.  When Johnson lost the people, he lost the will to fight, and he lost the will to live.  He dropped out of the 1968 Presidential race and went home to Texas where, “They know when you’re sick and care when you die.”

image

Richard Nixon, Johnson’s immediate successor and a President who knew something about heartbreak and failure, was among the best of those who tried to put LBJ’s last years in perspective:

"I think President Johnson died of a broken heart, I really do.  Here’s Johnson, this big, strong, intelligent, tough guy, practically getting so emotional that he’d almost cry, because his critics didn’t appreciate him.  He, till the very last, thought that he might be able to win them.  And the point was, rather than have them love him, he should have tried to do what he could have done very well — have them respect him.  And in the end he lost.  He neither gained the love nor retained the respect.”

It’s tough to love a guy like Lyndon Baines Johnson.  His own personality and Vietnam made it even more difficult.  But he does not get enough respect, even among historians who agree that he is shafted when it comes to his domestic accomplishments.  LBJ did more for Civil Rights than any other President.  Yes, I said, ANY other President.  Even Lincoln.  Lincoln did some great things.  Lincoln helped free the slaves.  But if Lincoln took off the shackles, LBJ enacted laws that protected their freedom.  Not just their freedom, either.  Our freedom.  You are all affected, every day, by something that Lyndon Johnson did.  If you don’t think so, tell me your daily schedule and I’ll give you an example.

On his 105th birthday, I’m not asking you to love Lyndon Johnson.  But I wouldn’t have posted an avalanche of LBJ content on his birthday if I didn’t.  I just hope you take the time to respect what he did, and that’s all I think he would ask of you, too.  Then he’d probably cuss at you and squeeze your arm and kick you in the shin and tell you to go raise hell.

I’ve only reblogged a fraction of what Anthony has posted today about LBJ, but I did want to say that it was Anthony’s writing that made me at least respect LBJ and realize the things he did for this country. For a long time, Vietnam overshadowed the rest of LBJ’s legacy for me, as it did for a lot of Americans.  

But deeper than that, I think we take too much of what LBJ did for granted, or we don’t realize the sheer importance of something like the Civil Rights Act, or the difficulty in getting it passed in a country that was barely a decade from Brown v. Board of Education. If you thought Obama had a rough road getting the ACA passed, imagine how much harder it would have been if the majority of the country hated doctors. 

My point is that it’s easy to consume facts about history and think you know it. But understanding it is something entirely different. Anthony clearly does, and, what’s more, he can make others understand it. And in a time where we’re literally taking away some of the same protections that the Civil Rights Act put in place, that’s more important than ever. If you don’t understand WHY Johnson did what he did, or HOW he did it, it’s hard to understand why the removal of some of the Voting Rights Act protections earlier this year is a huge problem. To pull out an old cliche, if we don’t pay attention to history, we are doomed to repeat it. I’d prefer to live in the country full of protections that Johnson left us, rather than the one that Wallace tried to preserve.

He did great things, but sadly he. like Nixon who followed him, will be remembered in popular history for his dogged refusal to accept the fact that the Vietnam war was unwinnable.

(via kyssthis16)

[video]